Make Me Feel Something

A marketer’s job in today’s omnichannel environment is to make the consumer feel something.

A tough ask in most categories, but especially so in technology. When the new news is about being data ready for the future, it’s almost a given that the marketing effort will lead with data. But data isn’t really a thing that evokes emotion in the average human (tech nerds aside).

But this past weekend, Dell delivered  two new power-packed campaign spots in the Beat Again effort, masterfully telling us stories: the “night before” a heart transplant for a pre-teen girl, and the “welcome back” as she returns to school healthy after her heart transplant.

The key elements in the story show emotional engagements between heart surgeon and his child, between mother and father of the heart patient, and between mother and daughter. The data displays are not always central to the storyline, but helpful and in the case of the sushi menu, even entertaining. Edited many ways so the frequency of spots over five days of the WGC golf event didn’t get annoying, the whole package left me feeling hopeful, inspired and in awe of what future data can do for a patient, a family, a surgeon and a community of classmates. Real People. Real Emotions.

To weave a story that connects the emotions of hope, inspiration and awe to the Dell brand all in one weekend is something Dell marketers and its agency partners Young & Rubicam should be damn proud of.

ShopperAnnie versus the Porn Star

Bet you didn’t know I chose @ShopperAnnie as my Twitter handle back in 2009 because there’s a porn star who calls herself Anne Howe. UGH!

Launching a professional consultant identity in the Shopper Marketing/Retail/Consumer Goods space is hard enough.  Competing with a nasty little porn star for a good ranking on a Google search for your real name – well that just gave me an incentive to work harder.

That’s why  when I chose my company name I added the word Associates – so I could use AHA! as part of my brand. I chose to expand my ShopperAnnie  “handle”  on my blog.

If I can slog it out on Google search with a porn star, think of what I can do for your business. Persistence pays off in the long run.

Publix rethinks the ubiquitous Retail Endcap

Yes, it’s true. I took a dozen in-store pictures in a grocery store while on vacation. But, it’s rare for @ShopperAnnie to get a chance to shop in a brand spanking new major grocery store. Overall, I’d rate this newly constructed Publix store a ten!

What impressed me the most? The front of store endcaps, which were clearly designed with plenty of shopper logic. If you’re in the shopper business, you might remember that traditionally, grocers want to draw shoppers to the back endcaps, to get them down more aisles.

Shoppers, however, want easy and fast access to the items they want most often, seeking to shorten the time they spend in the store, especially as trips change to more quick-trips and less time-consuming stock-up trips.

The best example of new thinking in endcap display is shown below  in what I’ll call the breakfast bar. Note the cooler with an areas for eggs, yogurt, meats and juice. Starbucks gets a great spot on the upper right and Qia – a new gluten-free superfood cereal from Nature’s Path is featured on the left.

Breakfast_Publix_April2013

Near the end of our trip, a co-traveler went to the Publix store at 7am to get a newspaper,  saw the butcher stocking a rolling  refrigerated case set at the front door with fresh cut pork chops surrounded by fresh broccoli and seasonal fruit. Over breakfast at the condo, he made the suggestion that we stop by Publix later to pick up that fresh pork for dinner. When we arrived at 4:00PM, the meat was being restocked and we were told the fresh chops had been cut only minutes before we arrived.

Bye, Bye Kiwi

Kiwi, you’ve been replaced by a banana. A peel of a banana, no less!

I recently read (in the AARP magazine, OMG did I just admit that?) that you can use a banana peel (the inside part) to polish leather shoes. Smear it on and buff it out after one minute with a soft cloth. A weird smell, banana on leather, but not as toxic as a whiff of chemical-laden polish out of that metal container.

As a marketer of consumer brands I feel somewhat guilty when I find a sure-fire organic no-cost solution to a problem. In this case, it means I will stop buying shoe polish, at least in brown.

As a consumer it’s frankly odd to rub banana peels on your $200 boots. But my last date with Kiwi ended badly when the color of an expensive and favorite pair of Ralph Lauren loafers turned into a blotchy mess of brown awfulness.

My boots look amazing, so do the ten year old Paul Green loafers I still love after all these years.  Oh what one banana peel can do!

And guess what else? The banana itself was a tasty treat in my greek yogurt smoothie! Now all I need is a white fruit option for my golf shoes!

Shopper Marketing – Climb into the Soup Bowl

I wish my corporate friends in shopper marketing would get out of their silo’s and climb into the soup bowl for once and for all. Come on friends, think about your own real life behavior. You don’t thing and act in marketing silo’s…and neither do your targeted shoppers.

When will marketing people stop thinking the world of quant data is more important versus a world of measuring human engagement and relationship?

We live in the world of soup, blended with incredible flavors. Would you eat soup with only one ingredient? No. Layers of flavor are just like layers of integrated, synchronized communication. Seamless and tasty. And fulfilling to the shopper.

It’s time to talk more about what is real and what is bulls&*t in the marketing services business. I’m standing up in the kitchen with something to say about blended recipes. They work.

What’s your recipe?

 

High on Monster High

It’s hard to stay up on all the trends I need to know in retail, shopper marketing, culture…engagement, advocacy…you name it…I’m supposed to know about it.  Honey Boo Boo? Really? We’re over your gross lack of manners. Gangnam Style? Whatever…

My new curiosity is Monster High. I’m looking for a couple of ten year olds to play with. I’ll invest in the dolls and  sets of accessories to go with.  Really, I will. I also want to play dolls with all the moms. This is fertile ground for woman culture.

Just look at the branding. Is this the next gen Hello Kitty or what?

Branding at its finest!!

Be Yourself. Be Unique. Be A Monster.

Just ask my husband. I can be all of the above on any given day. And then I can go play with my dolls. Acting out stories. Like a ten year old.

Monsters? Or Zombies? Connections to apps with big glitzy keys on the packages…..

 

Clawdeen – the best seller

What ARE the stories the dolls act out for ten year olds today?Is Monster High a next-gen storyboard? Could it be a comic book reality show? Is it individually crafted visual story telling, or script some marketer is pushing?

Is this toy story, next chapter? Let’s play.

What’s the story behind this?

 

Branding at its finest!!

The Maxxinista in Me

If you are female, you have it in your DNA. If you are male and have it too, shopping is never a drudgery. We, the shoppers, create our own fun and games in the stores, especially when we’re on adventure mission mode for a bargain.

Enter the Maxxinista. She reads the September issues. If  you have to ask, stop now and thanks for stopping by.

She seeks silhouettes, colors, fabrics. This is not about brands, it’s all about style, tempered by what you can get away with for dates, work, conferences, you know…the cleavage factor…a.k.a. how short IS that skirt.

In a lot of high end retail, the selection is curated and adapted from the runway collections. In TJ Maxx, it’s great knock offs and prizes galore. At half the price or less. Mastering the experience is part of the empowerment, right?

This retailer knows their shopper psyche, enhancing the experience with better merchandising, nicer dressing rooms with a limit of TEN garments, not 6, and don’t forget they have year-round layaway!

Only yesterday, which was Labor Day, I overhead a well-heeled woman in a very busy TJ’s store exclaiming delight at finding current Nordstrom dresses at half the price. She was beaming, I might add.

Those Ellen Tracy “Spartan Green” skinny jeans for $39.99?  Those Vince Camuto slim fit spot-on trendy blue ankle pants for $24.99? Searching and finding trendy Michael Kors key pieces that fit?

What’s not to love? Half off. What’s not to inspire more shopping?

Now stop and think about the 60% of the population that hasn’t had a raise effectively since Lyndon Johnson was President. Welcome to the largest shopper segment in America.

What’s your strategy to win her over?

 

 

 

PayPal – Brand or Commodity?

Well. I just got an e-mail to take a survey about PayPal. I thought: “I use it, so why not take the survey?”

I think I flunked.  The invite told me it would take ten minutes, which I was willing to invest…but it only took two…..a sure sign of self-select termination survey research.

When I thought about it while answering the first few questions, the brand doesn’t really have a benefit to me other than it allows me to pay my tech service vendor with one-click.  I literally use it ONLY for that. When I answered the first two questions in that frank of a manner, the survey then stopped, and told me “Thanks, we have no further questions.”

Hmmmm. I have a sneaking feeling that in fact, PayPal might want to hear more about why I dumped its brand into a commodity category the moment I tried to find more than a convenience benefit and could not. I can’t recall thinking about wanting or trying to set up PayPal to be my go-to payment method for anything else. I have a (sort-of) positive feelings about the brand, but when pressed , those feeling are really not anything I’ve ever acted on.

The oddest thing is, as I dissect what just happened, I still can’t summon up any desire or reason to change things.

To think…how quickly what you might think is a brand can become just another commodity……..

 

When P&G Invests, Pay Attention

I am re-posting an article from today’s Wall Street Journal in its entirety. Why? Because in my twenty years of shopper marketing, I’ve learned that when P&G makes a commitment to anything designed to make it easier for consumers to stay in their billion dollar brand franchises, marketers everywhere should pay attention.

I think this investment is an AHA! moment in mobile marketing.  It has tremendous potential to be a huge moment of truth for P&G brands AND to ensure that shoppers can trust the tech just like they trust the P&G brands. It might take a while to get it right, but the magic of P&G investments is that they are early and insightful.

 

P&G Clears Plan for Mobile Coupons

Dec. 20, 2011 Posted in the Wall Street Journal, by HANNAH KARP

Digital coupons are catching on with consumers, but the market’s growth has been hampered by a pesky problem: Many retailers still aren’t equipped with laser scanners that can detect bar codes off of the reflective, shiny, backlit screen of a smartphone.

Procter & Gamble Co. is working on a potential solution. The consumer-goods giant said Monday it is working with start-up mobeam Inc. on a pilot program that will allow consumers to redeem coupons for P&G products straight from their phones. San Francisco-based mobeam has patented a way to beam out a bar code from the screen of a phone that is legible to normal laser scanners.

U.S. consumers saved more than $1.2 billion from redeeming digital coupons in 2010, according to a research report by digital-coupon provider Coupons.com, up 41% from a year earlier.

The challenge for mobeam now will be to get its technology integrated into smartphones so consumers can use it. The technology must be installed in the guts of a phone, which requires the cooperation of device makers.

Mobeam says it is working with handset makers so that tens of millions of phones hitting the market in 2012 will include its technology, though it declined to say what device makers it is in discussions with. Samsung Venture Investment Corp., the venture-capital arm of Samsung Group, a large maker of mobile devices, recently invested money in mobeam.

Scanning technology is improving slowly. Airlines and some retailers like Target and Walgreens have developed technology to scan bar codes off of the mobile coupons they issue themselves, but consumer companies cannot guarantee exactly where customers will be able to use their coupons since they don’t control the checkout lines.

For P&G, another potential payoff could come from the data it could gather from consumers who use the digital coupons. Mobeam says it will provide its partners with a trove of information about their mobile coupon users with consumer permission, allowing companies to track where and when they redeem them and what they buy.

My Missoni Mistake

I’m no rookie when it comes to shopping. This morning, while commenting on shopper behavior on the RetailWire site where I’m an “expert panelist” I made the decision to switch my planned grocery trip to Target (not Meijer) and go check out the Missoni apparel scene. The discussion topic was about the shopper quest for a trophy purchase, and I used the Missoni collection at Target as an example.

Before heading out, I browsed the collection on Target.com, noting a few sweaters I might consider as my personal trophy purchase.  The “out of stock” notices on much of the apparel online should have been my first clue.

Indeed, only one day after the launch,  every rack of Missoni at my local Target was already re-stocked with Merona, Xhiliration and Mossimo items. Even the kids area and the accessories areas were bare. The only Missoni item left in the entire store was a plastic headband, hardly the statement piece I thought I might acquire.

Target got an $86.00 basket ring from my journey for a fashion find. The closest thing to fashion in the cart, however, was Maybeline mascara.

Savvy shopper that I am,  I tracked down an “in-the-know” associate who gave me the story ( it ALL sold out in 30 minutes, she reported) AND whispered to me the date that the store will have more Missoni. That date is not advertised and will remain my dirtly little secret until I rectify that mistake and get my trophy Missoni sweater.

I can’t remember the last time a retail event made me note my calendar, set an alarm alert and will get me in the store the minute they unlock the door.