I already bought that, dammit.

See the post below from 2013? This issue of online retailers incessantly marketing products to me that I’ve already purchased is rampant and still annoying as hell.

I’ve been off this blog for a while now, working for a marketing firm, moving to North Carolina and traveling North America.

Which means I’ve been shopping online, more and more. I even ordered fixtures and hardware online  last winter while building a new house. But Amazon continues to advertise more bathroom fixtures to me via special emails offering me a sale price a year after the house is built. Come on Amazon, you must know I’m not a builder.

Why don’t  you email me when my age-defying, expensive face wash from Dr. Murad is on sale? I actually want to buy that about 4 or 5 times a year?

And the very same  lamp I bought from LampsPlus.com – and returned due to inaccurate color photography  –  is popping up on my Facebook feed within a week to remind me that I might want to buy it again? Ugh. No.

Online retailers, you have data. Please use it with the mindfulness of a human being. It’s shameful that after all this time your data doesn’t translate into learning. Can you at least TRY to know me, after all these years?  That’s supposed to be the “value”  – you making my shopping life easier and more convenient. Right?

I’m traveling less now. And shopping in real stores where I can talk to real humans. If I can find any left.

Falling out of like with online shopping


Two weeks ago, I ordered an outdoor rug for my back deck from you.  I was so pleased to find the selection you offerred, and did a bit of exploring on your site to determine the size and style I wanted. I love that my chosen rug was a good price, the shipping date was very reasonable, and in less than three days the rug was on the deck, under the new table. Imagine how happy I was to have my neighbors over for dinner, collecting compliments on my style of outdoor entertaining.

So, why oh why, Overstock, do you continue to show up in my Facebook feed as a sponsored post with views and ads of all the other rugs I looked at but did not order???

Come on now, you know I bought one of the 5 styles I was looking at. Why do you now haunt (read as annoy) me with the other 4?

This the is most shopper-annoying part of technology.

It makes me want to delete my Overstock.com account. Instead of helping me, you are interrupting my life while I am trying to enjoy what I bought from you already.


I;m falling out of like with you.


A Tramp Stamp on the Tomato!

I can’t wait to see if there will be a “tramp stamp” on my store-bought tomatoes one day soon. Change is coming to the produce industry.  Tattoos may soon replace those annoying but helpful little stickers you find on most fruits and veggies. 

There’s a secret trick to deciphering number codes on produce stickers – those leading with the number 9 are organic food, and those that lead with 4 are just plain food, grown however the farmer chooses.  Remember this: nine is fine and four is a bore.

I wonder if the tattoos will be tiny and hard to see like the stickers are now or big and artistic like a full sleeve? I wonder if shoppers will find the tattoos offensive or perceive them to be dangerous to eat?

This trend is beginning in Europe. Can you guess which U. S. retailer will lead the way with tattooed produce? Flip a coin on Whole Foods or Walmart. Sustainability is key to them both, and that’s what’s behind the tattoo movement.

I like the idea of tattoos on produce. I look forward to the day that I will no longer have to stick the labels from the veggies all over my hand when I’m prepping the organic goodies for the juicer.


The Full Sleeve



Publix rethinks the ubiquitous Retail Endcap

Yes, it’s true. I took a dozen in-store pictures in a grocery store while on vacation. But, it’s rare for @ShopperAnnie to get a chance to shop in a brand spanking new major grocery store. Overall, I’d rate this newly constructed Publix store a ten!

What impressed me the most? The front of store endcaps, which were clearly designed with plenty of shopper logic. If you’re in the shopper business, you might remember that traditionally, grocers want to draw shoppers to the back endcaps, to get them down more aisles.

Shoppers, however, want easy and fast access to the items they want most often, seeking to shorten the time they spend in the store, especially as trips change to more quick-trips and less time-consuming stock-up trips.

The best example of new thinking in endcap display is shown below  in what I’ll call the breakfast bar. Note the cooler with an areas for eggs, yogurt, meats and juice. Starbucks gets a great spot on the upper right and Qia – a new gluten-free superfood cereal from Nature’s Path is featured on the left.


Near the end of our trip, a co-traveler went to the Publix store at 7am to get a newspaper,  saw the butcher stocking a rolling  refrigerated case set at the front door with fresh cut pork chops surrounded by fresh broccoli and seasonal fruit. Over breakfast at the condo, he made the suggestion that we stop by Publix later to pick up that fresh pork for dinner. When we arrived at 4:00PM, the meat was being restocked and we were told the fresh chops had been cut only minutes before we arrived.

A Penny Less is Not Less

Really? Come on Walmart algorithms.

I’m not one to bash retailers that compete with Amazon. I say this because it’s really about experience, not price.  But retailers believe that for most shoppers,  it’s about price, so being a shopper marketing consultant, I play the game.

That said, I’ve installed this app called Invisible Hand, which tells me, when I’m browsing online, where I can find what I’m looking at cheaper. Note the yellow bar at the top of the “screen capture” below.


png_ Price compare


This morning I get an e-mail from Barnes & Noble about new books. I’m looking at Bobby Deen’s just-released today cookbook. He’s taken his Mams Paula Deen’s recipes and slashed the fat and calories, but not the flavor.

I jump over to Amazon (without clicking on B&N site, sorry) and check out the Kindle version, then the paperback version. Then the yellow bar pops up and tells me I can get this book for $0.01 cheaper at Walmart.com.

As I said, I’n not a retail basher at heart. I truly believe that some algorithm somewhere in cyberland did this to me today.

I want to declare to the technology bot that “A Penny Less is NOT Less.” If the bot tells its human programmer, that’s good. but it probably won’t, because it’s probably not listening to the human reaction I had.

With that behind me, I can now experience the experience Amazon has perfected, the one-click order button. I’ll be testing recipes on Thursday.

Shopper Marketing – Climb into the Soup Bowl

I wish my corporate friends in shopper marketing would get out of their silo’s and climb into the soup bowl for once and for all. Come on friends, think about your own real life behavior. You don’t thing and act in marketing silo’s…and neither do your targeted shoppers.

When will marketing people stop thinking the world of quant data is more important versus a world of measuring human engagement and relationship?

We live in the world of soup, blended with incredible flavors. Would you eat soup with only one ingredient? No. Layers of flavor are just like layers of integrated, synchronized communication. Seamless and tasty. And fulfilling to the shopper.

It’s time to talk more about what is real and what is bulls&*t in the marketing services business. I’m standing up in the kitchen with something to say about blended recipes. They work.

What’s your recipe?


The Grabbing Power of Visual Icons

During a recent visit to Target in search of new earbuds to replace a pair that got stepped on, I found myself standing at the electronics counter making a purchase. While I am in fact a shopper that notices many things, clutter around a retail counter rarely gets any attention. Mainly I think its annoying and in the way.

But, in the midst of paying, SOMETHING ICONIC caught my eye. It was on a typical rack of gift cards –  a sea of clutter that’s hard to read and impossible to shop, in my humble opinion.

But these babies jumped out at me big time. Why?

These icons spell “pleasure” to the brain!!


Because my brain is patterned to recognize the two images as associated with pleasure. So, while out of context in a store versus on a screen, they break through the clutter and get noticed.

Nice work, Apple.  I almost gifted myself on the spot. Almost.

Retail Fitness? Off the scale……

My son, 23, can not afford a fancy gym membership, but he does pay for a basic workout membership at a local franchised Planet Fitness.

In the club, there’s a separate area with tanning beds, massage tables… you know…the spa side. It’s usually not very busy.

So, when he inquired about the option for a per-use visit fee, seeking to book a massage, he was told that basic members cannot buy services in the mostly empty spa side on a one-off basis.


“Because it’s too confusing for the employees.”

You tell me why “retail” is so unfit today!


Walmart on the move – to your doorstep

Retailing today is at an inflection point unlike I’ve ever seen in my “too many to count” years in the business. No retailer has as much at risk or to gain than Walmart. The company is one of the most fascinating stories to follow and talk about in the industry today.

As you might know by now, one of my retail/shopper marketing industry opportunities is being a panelist on the Retail Wire portal
where I post comments regularly on one or more of three discussion topics listed every weekday.

Today, we have a story about Walmart on the move, this time with a courier to your doorstep, delivering on the incessant need we have for instant gratification from the online shopping experience. Walmart, with logistics rigor, and stores galore, can and will deliver happiness to you the same day you click. (in some markets, they are in test expansion mode).

Is this the BIG opportunity in the making  for Walmart or a desperate reaction to the muscle of Amazon as it flexes to deliver same day to the 45% of US adult shoppers who name them as the number one place they shop online?

I believe Walmart is one of the bravest retailers  out there, with a renewed interest in testing and learning what’s good for the shoppers and good for their business too. I support this move, and I think it has HUGE potential upside in the two most important consumer groups to retail – Boomer and Gen Y consumers.  Read why….

Then read what everyone has to say on this critical topic. I believe that I’ve gained more insight and intellect from the power of the group discussion than from any other form of media in this business.

Join the movers and shakers and read RetailWire. Add your comments and raise the level of insight even higher! It’s not just Walmart on the move. Retail is racing to a tipping point, it’s critical for more thought leaders, like you, to join the discussion.



The Maxxinista in Me

If you are female, you have it in your DNA. If you are male and have it too, shopping is never a drudgery. We, the shoppers, create our own fun and games in the stores, especially when we’re on adventure mission mode for a bargain.

Enter the Maxxinista. She reads the September issues. If  you have to ask, stop now and thanks for stopping by.

She seeks silhouettes, colors, fabrics. This is not about brands, it’s all about style, tempered by what you can get away with for dates, work, conferences, you know…the cleavage factor…a.k.a. how short IS that skirt.

In a lot of high end retail, the selection is curated and adapted from the runway collections. In TJ Maxx, it’s great knock offs and prizes galore. At half the price or less. Mastering the experience is part of the empowerment, right?

This retailer knows their shopper psyche, enhancing the experience with better merchandising, nicer dressing rooms with a limit of TEN garments, not 6, and don’t forget they have year-round layaway!

Only yesterday, which was Labor Day, I overhead a well-heeled woman in a very busy TJ’s store exclaiming delight at finding current Nordstrom dresses at half the price. She was beaming, I might add.

Those Ellen Tracy “Spartan Green” skinny jeans for $39.99?  Those Vince Camuto slim fit spot-on trendy blue ankle pants for $24.99? Searching and finding trendy Michael Kors key pieces that fit?

What’s not to love? Half off. What’s not to inspire more shopping?

Now stop and think about the 60% of the population that hasn’t had a raise effectively since Lyndon Johnson was President. Welcome to the largest shopper segment in America.

What’s your strategy to win her over?